In Summary
  • This system renders safe and transports exhaust from the car engine while it also uses some of it to stabilise the engine for efficient running.
  • To investigate the emission system, a mechanic will have to carry out a diagnostic check and inspection of key components of your engine emission system: the catalytic converter, oxygen sensors, intake and exhaust manifolds, exhaust pipe, the engine venting system or PCV (Positive Crankcase ventilator).

Hello Paul. I drive a Volkswagen Polo 2004. It has been good to me for more than two years but now it keeps showing on the dashboard “engine workshop” and “emissions workshop” what does this mean? Please advise because I still love with my car. Shyla.

Hello Shyla, your VW Polo has a fault in the engine emission control system. The onboard computer has recorded a failure to achieve preset parameters and flagged a system fault status to draw attention to the problem which affects fuel efficiency and engine performance. This system in post 1990 vehicles is designed to limit the release of environmentally harmful gases from the internal combustion engine and other components.

There are four main sources of these gases which include the engine exhaust, crank case, fuel tank and throttle potentiometer. Your Polo’s engine, like all other similar vehicles relies on the emission system to run cleanly and efficiently. This system renders safe and transports exhaust from the car engine while it also uses some of it to stabilise the engine for efficient running.

To investigate the emission system, a mechanic will have to carry out a diagnostic check and inspection of key components of your engine emission system: the catalytic converter, oxygen sensors, intake and exhaust manifolds, exhaust pipe, the engine venting system or PCV (Positive Crankcase ventilator).
A computer diagnosis will quickly point to the faulty components for action. The emission system can be affected by failure to service vital components such as the spark plugs, air cleaner and fuel filter. Occasionally, a damaged exhaust pipe or filling your tank with adulterated fuel can also cause this problem.