In Summary
  • Thank you because with every turn and bend, with every hill, valley and anthill, we have grown. We are smarter, kinder, more gracious and we appreciate the sunshine the same way we value the rain and the mud that comes with it.
  • How deeply I treasured the few times when Mukyala Nantongo allowed me to visit my cousins who lived in Ntinda; the excitement of walking from school to the taxi park and the thrill of sharing a taxi seat with a fellow who had eaten their transport money. My elder cousin Ronnie was a pro when it came to sitting on the famous Kameme.

December is perhaps my second favourite month after July.
The children have been away visiting relatives on the maternal and paternal sides. Perhaps, they will pick up some Luganda lines and make some Luwombo too.

Simply put, being away has allowed me bask and enjoy my precious moments of solitude. Words are not sufficient to describe how important and deeply valuable these moments are, which is funny because growing up, I really hated quiet places.

Growing up in Nakasero was interesting. Many of the homes were on large extensive compounds. We did not freely interact with the other neighbour. I remember visiting and envying classmates who lived in the busier and more crowded neighbourhoods like Old Kampala, Makerere Kivulu, the famous Makerere and Bugolobi flats. It felt like the children there got to play and be around each other all the time.

I envied classmates who walked to the taxi park to travel home while some of us walked to and from school because home was within walking distance from school.
How deeply I treasured the few times when Mukyala Nantongo allowed me to visit my cousins who lived in Ntinda; the excitement of walking from school to the taxi park and the thrill of sharing a taxi seat with a fellow who had eaten their transport money. My elder cousin Ronnie was a pro when it came to sitting on the famous Kameme.

At university, I stayed in the nosiest hostel in the centre of Wandegeya.
These were some of my most pleasant times despite the fact that at 2am, Wandegeya felt like broad daylight with the night-lifers going on without a care in the world.

I often slept peacefully throughout my stay there. In fact, when I visited mom in quiet Nakasero, I only managed a few hours before quickly heading back.
And here I am, craving and guarding with a vicious ferocity my place of peace and quiet; treasured, sacred moments of deep, inner reflection.

Seeing how fast the year passed by, one ponders the last 12 months and the coming 11. We ask where the time flew to; whether its the year counting us or us counting the year.
Older and definitely wiser, we look at 2018 not only with optimism but enthusiasm for a fresh start.

Thank you God for 2017! Thank you for the lessons, for the triumphs. By your power and grace, we have gone through it. Thank you for the blessings, for the laughter and for the gifts of life and friendship.

Thank you because with every turn and bend, with every hill, valley and anthill, we have grown. We are smarter, kinder, more gracious and we appreciate the sunshine the same way we value the rain and the mud that comes with it.
Thank you for 2018. By you we match along as gallant soldiers. By you, we face the future with confidence.

mirembeabola@gmail.com