In Summary

The survey covered a geographical area of Kampala District and some urban areas of Wakiso District. Ubos uses the Hedonic pricing approach to compute the Residential Property Price Index.
Hedonic pricing identifies price factors with determining characteristics affecting both internal and external features of the property.

Kampala. Property prices in Greater Kampala increased to an average of 5.2 per cent in the 2018/19 financial year, according to the data from Uganda Bureau of Statistics (Ubos).
Data compiled under the Residential Property Price Index for Great Kampala Metropolitan Area indicated that the increase was higher in Rubaga and Wakiso and lowest in Nakawa.
For instance, in Wakiso, Kampala and Makindye property prices increased by 3.5 per cent compared to 2.5 and 6.6 per cent in Kawempe and Rubaga, respectively.
However, in Nakawa rates declined to -7.4 per cent during the period compared to 0.9 per cent in the 2017/18 financial year.
Mr Samuel Kaisiromwe, the Ubos senior statistician, said the property price increase was about 2.5 per cent in the 2017/18 financial year, noting that property prices in Greater Kampala have been increasing, especially in Wakiso, Kampala, Makindye and Rubaga.
The survey covered a geographical area of Kampala District and some urban areas of Wakiso District.
Ubos uses the Hedonic pricing approach to compute the Residential Property Price Index.
Hedonic pricing identifies price factors with determining characteristics affecting both internal and external features of the property.
Residential real estate provides housing facilities for a number of families and is often a source of wealth and savings for many families.
The housing sector has turned into an investment with real estate players continuously re-assessing value and return on investment.
However, return on investment has, according to data, been affected by a decline in prices of residential properties.
According to Ubos, Uganda currently has a deficit of 2.1m housing units and is expected to reach three million by 2030. The deficit, data shows, will further expand to eight million units, of which 2.5m will be in urban centres in two decades.

Population growth
Doubling population. The challenge of population growth – which is currently growing at about 3.2 per annum annually, roughly means that after every 20 years, Uganda’s population doubles and continues to have serious impact on the country’s housing sector.