In Summary
  • Last year, President Museveni commissioned more than 10 projects he funded through formation of Savings and Credit Cooperative Societies (Saccos).

Kampala. President Museveni has offered Shs3 billion for funding upcoming youth projects in 35 districts across the country.
Addressing journalists in Wandegeya, Kampala, on Friday, Ms Valentine Kasaija, the special presidential personal assistant on youth affairs, said the money will be used to skill 10 leaders in each earmarked district so that they can go and train others.
Ms Kasaija said the youth leaders will be trained in making of soap, shampoo, tailoring and salon, among other skills, for the project that will begin early next month.

“The youth have a lot to do and this can be translated into employment. There has been an outcry of unemployment but this will solve it partly. The President has given this money and later he will be going around giving machines,” Ms Kasaija said.
Last year, President Museveni commissioned more than 10 projects he funded through formation of Savings and Credit Cooperative Societies (Saccos).

Some of the commissioned facilities are Katabi Artisan Sacco, Namasuba Furniture Makers Sacco, Najja 1 Furniture and Metal Work Association, Kabuusu Wielders and Traders Sacco, Kibuye Drivers and Conductors Sacco, Lubiri Lorry Drivers and Co-Drivers Sacco, Busega United Timber and Sellers Sacco and Busega Welders Sacco.
The President also handed out Shs100m to the ghetto youth of Kamwokya, a Kampala suburb, in the same month. However, a section of the public criticised the initiative, saying it had been born out of the pressure brought by some Opposition leaders who were rallying the youth, especially Kyadondo East Member of Parliament Robert Kyagulanyi aka Bobi Wine.

Mr Museveni said in the Financial Year 2018/2019 budget, Shs1.119 trillion had been put aside for Operation Wealth Creation programme, Youth Fund, Women Fund, Micro-finance, Northern Uganda Social Action Fund, Luweero Triangle Fund, and KCCA, among other initiatives, through which this money is channelled to the beneficiaries.