In Summary
  • No supervisor will be pleased if they get to know that you’re focusing on a side gig especially if your performance at work is declining

My boss says I shouldn’t advertise my side hustle on social media. My side hustle is baking cakes while my office job is in accounts for a scholastic material company. There is no conflict of interest so I don’t understand what my boss’ problem is. Please advice. Linda

Dear Linda,
A side business/hustle/gig can be defined as having a part time job besides your main job without the intent of replacing it. This has become popular over the years and forward looking, employers understand that prohibitions on side hustles can stifle creativity, create a culture of distrust and more so employers may lose out on exceptional and industrious employees.
The main job usually comprises a larger portion of an employee‘s income which at times is used to fund the side gig. Sometimes full time jobs pay for professional development like conferences, courses and trainings which maybe an opportunity to potentially grow the side hustle with new skills or network for clients.
Striking a balance between the two can be difficult and may result into side hustle burn out. This might be reflected through stress, tiredness and loss of interest in the main job.
Try to reflect and establish if your approach towards work has changed, remember no supervisor will be pleased if they get to know that you’re focusing on a side gig especially if your performance at work is declining.
Establish the time that you have to devote to your side hustle outside the compulsory hours of the full time job. Be realistic about what you can handle, create and stick to a schedule, being organised and dedicated will increase your productivity for both.

Alice Nankya L. Nsibuka
HR business partner
NMG - Uganda
anankya@ntv.co.ug